Prostitution was the first job in the entire history of mankind. It may have been for some nuts and berries or like a rabbit or something but the commodity of love has and always will be the first sought after service of human nature.


The “selling of love” can

look like a

lot of different things. These days, people are now getting paid in ‘likes.’ There’s a reason the damn icon is shaped like a heart. Tapping that is like tipping a civil stripper that’s feeding your starvation for some sort of catharsis. 


when paired with our obsession with online love (tinder, grindr) and how the monetization of platforms such as YouTube and tip sites/apps like Twitch, Only Fans and Patreon have opened up possibly the next great job market of the free, new AND ELECTRONIC world. 


People are getting noticed for their uniqueness everyday, and the internet can be a beautiful place to share those niches in the human spirit.



With that comes its own set of problems. It’s going to make people feel desperate to make themselves known online by any means necessary. Not everyone can be the world's most interesting person, but with a heavy thanks to technology (cosmetic surgery, drugs, piercings, tattoos) people can make themselves appear to be the most physically intriguing person. Just look at the human Ken doll who is constantly popping up online with whatever new cosmetic procedure he’s trying to add. I think he’s around his 1000th right now, at least he said that in a video where he was getting his “dream legs.”


There is nothing wrong with surgery to get the body you desire... it just should not be peoples very first choice on their road to self-love.


More than ever, now, is the expectation that it should be easier to figure out who you are just because it’s easier to collect more data about yourself. If anything, this would make it more difficult for a young person to decide who and what they want to be, especially when the internet provides advertisements for just about any lifestyle one can think of.


To a young person that believes being a “paid online persona” is the best job in life to get, there’s a chance they could start to treat their life and appearance as a giant performance, or a spectacle, which would end up being, most likely, quite detrimental.


Just look at the rapper 6ix9ine (a.k.a. Daniel Hernandez). He is the poster child for someone addicted to the artificial love some call “attention”. More specifically, in this case, it would be called “clout”. That is somewhere between a cheap kind of respect or momentary fire. Just a shit ton of “clout” and shouting space on the Internet to feel significantly heard, but for some people that is enough.


The guy literally wanted to be noticed so badly that in highschool he started modeling outfits branded with HIV on Instagram and it wasn’t in the spirit of AIDS awareness, either.


Supreme Patty is also off somewhere squeezing lemons in his eyes and breaking bongs. Not the absolute worst influencer role model, but certainly not the best.


More and more “internet stars” exemplify the “get rich quick” scheme which is acting out in obnoxious ways because to get attention online, you have to STAND OUT, which is getting increasingly hard to do. People like 6ix9ine promote a shortcut to achieving Internet stardom but through detrimental behavior… such as tattooing your entire face and disrespecting dead celebrities.


There is danger when making yourself your profession... it will make it much harder to see where you end, and where the product begins. Some people might feel like they must squeeze their mutli-dimensial personality into a tiny brand just to make a living.


I feel, as a collective, we can all agree that, no matter what, we want to enjoy our job. We want to “love what we do for a living.” That has been the end-all-be-all dream for, probably, a lot of generations.


Technology has the potential to knock out a huge chunk of the manual-labor job market but then what would be left? We are connective creatures by nature. With robots (one day) doing the dirty work...maybe this would leave more room for humans to practice the humanities, arts, philosophy, and other crafts.


Disturbance is the catalyst to change. At least, my quarantine experience was a pretty big, forced moment of reflection, but judging by my social media feeds many people picked up new hobbies, harbored old talents, or dusted off old works during the COVID period. Upon Corona-virus reflection it appears America was given about a year's time to do whatever the hell people actually felt like doing.


Perhaps this was the reason the vi

rus started in the first place. To usher in a brand new kind of world. One that isn’t necessarily easier to navigate, but the future could be directly in the peoples hands for the first time in history.


The internet is the great equa

lizer. The unequal distribution of wealth was something that would have been quite impossible to change, if it wasn’t for new virtual currencies making a brand new generation and demographic rich.


That, combined with some time to hatch a plan and the monetization of social media could make it easier to do something you actually enjoy for a living.


Throughout history the one industry that’s always thrived during hard times was the entertainment industry.


Art has proven time and time again to be a trampoline for societal hardships, helping people cope, connect and share new ideas for the future.


During the peak of the Great Depression, from 1918 to 1928, there was a crazy increase in Broadway theatres from 48 to 76 (+28) difference.


Expect an influx of Avant garde art and media will be flowing forth upon the interwebs of this upside down lifestyle and condition switch.


How would you feel if personality selling businesses (YouTube, only fans, Patreon) took over the general job market? Do you think this would hinder or help humanity if the “average job” was expression/creation based? How would you feel about that sort of world?


It is also known that instagram took control of their platforms by taking away the consecutive order of posts and showing each user (out of chronological order) what they feel they would benefit most from seeing. I really have no clue how this algorithm decides what the user would like to see, but if instagram or any other media sharing platform wants to change the world (for the better), it should promote positive content instead of what people will watch out of pure shock.


When the human brain sees something negative it hits a survival nerve making us feel as if we must take in that media so we better understand the situation that we find undesirable. Communication began as a survival technique. This is how we have learned to survive in the world: to heed warnings. When you hear news of someone passing away, the first question you ask someone is “how?” I think it’s human nature to do this because the more information you know about what not to do, the better informed your decision will be regarding what to do.  The consumption of media is about to be at an all time high. This is one of the big reasons fake news is such an epidemic in these times. They say the media is the unnoficial 4th branch of military and I believe it god dammit. They aren’t much more moral either.

Technology is the newest slave to humanity. Good, maybe we will be nicer to each other now that we have more time on our hands. If all people see are fights each time they tap in their phone, what do you think they will be expecting to find when they step foot out into reality? We need to get people expectant of good shit. We need to make positivity the norm if we want to live a positive lifestyle. We need more caution surrounding the media we choose to ingest, because much like fast food, you get what you put in.


That’s not to say, hide the bad news.


It’s to say stop promoting a negative message with your time or energy just cause it gives you a quick fix of entertainment.


If you hold yourself to a higher standard of what you want to see, content creators will have to comply.

The power is in the peoples hands, literally.


What kind of world do we want to be curating?